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Tigers engage in insightful dialogue during Black History Month talk show
CLARKSDALE – Coahoma Community College’s Black History Month committee sparked a healthy dialogue between students, faculty and staff Tuesday morning during a “Talk Show on Current Events” as part of 2016 Black History Month activities.

Tigers engage in insightful dialogue during Black History Month talk show

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4061 - Brittany Davis-Green - bdavis@coahomacc.edu

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Wed Feb 17, 2016

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CCC "Talk Show on Current Events" panelist included, from left, CCC Health, Physical Education and Recreation Chair Dr. Shirley Edwards; CCC Director of Admissions Michael Houston; CCC Talent Search Director Joseph McKee; and CCC Financial Aid Director Luke Howard. Not pictured is CCC English Instructor Wanda Lee.

CLARKSDALE – Coahoma Community College’s Black History Month committee sparked a healthy dialogue between students, faculty and staff Tuesday morning during a “Talk Show on Current Events” as part of 2016 Black History Month activities.

Tigers learned about the benefits of healthy eating, the importance of voting, admission and financial aid information and financial independence during the “talk show” hosted at 10 a.m. in the Whiteside Hall lecture room.

The event was part of a series of events sponsored by CCC’s Division of Academic Affairs in observance of February Black History Month.

Panelist included: CCC Health, Physical Education and Recreation Chair Dr. Shirley Edwards; CCC Director of Admissions Michael Houston; CCC Financial Aid Director Luke Howard; CCC English Instructor Wanda Lee; and CCC Talent Search Director Joseph McKee.

“We wanted to encourage all of our students to achieve, and achievement begins with knowledge,” said CCC Black History Month Chair Vera Griffin. “This event gave our students the opportunity to receive a wealth of information from our panel, and we’re very grateful to the panel for being willing to share this information with out students.”

The panel discussion began with Edwards, who encouraged the audience to not only learn to eat healthy, but exercise.

“Mississippi leads in heart disease, strokes and diabetes all because of how we’re eating,” said Edwards.

She stressed the importance of drinking water, portion control, watching sodium intake, and eating unhealthy foods in moderation.

Houston continued the conversation by giving students, especially graduating sophomores, admission tips. He encouraged students to apply at least one semester in advance to guarantee admission to their program of study and housing.

“When you go to a university, you’re not going to be able to walk in on the first day and take care of all your business,” he said. “It’s important to get in the habit now of getting your applications in ahead of time.”

Howard echoed a similar message, encouraging students to apply for their FAFSA as soon as they can.

“Financial aid is first come, first served—everyone who fills out a FAFSA application in America is competing for the same money. It’s to your advantage to be first in line by getting you application early,” Howard said.

He also encouraged students to be aggressive about making sure their financial affairs are in order and to perform well academically.

“Financial aid is for students,” said Howard. “What does that mean? Go to class, because students are in class.”

Lee led the conversation about the importance of voting.

“This is a major election year, we’re about to elect a new president,” she told students. “ You need to educate yourself on the candidates, their views and what they stand for. …Don’t say your vote doesn’t make a difference—every vote counts!

McKee concluded the “talk show” by admonishing students to learn “how money works”.

“One thing that keeps us behind financially is that we don’t think about our future. We have been taught to be consumers.”

He challenged students to begin saving and planning for retirement now.

“We want money, but people lack money because they lack information,” he said. “Money is always making money for somebody, somewhere.”

In addition insightful dialogue, the program also included special entertainment from CCC’s Women’s Ensemble and Men’s Ensemble.

CCC’s Black History Month activities will wrap up Wednesday, Feb. 24 with a culminating program from 10:15 a.m. until noon in the Pinnacle.

CLICK HERE to view more photos from the event on CCC's Facebook page!