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CCC instructor visits Quebec for professional development
CLARKSDALE – A Coahoma Community College instructor was given the opportunity to connect with other professionals in the international education field during a recent professional development experience abroad.

CCC instructor visits Quebec for professional development

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4061 - Brittany Davis-Green - bdavis@coahomacc.edu

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Wed Apr 27, 2016

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CCC Computer Servicing Technology Instructor Melvin “Tony” Newson (second row, far right) recently traveled to the University of Concordia in Montréal, Quebec, as part of Jackson State University’s Executive Ph.D. Program in Urban Higher Education program.

CLARKSDALE – A Coahoma Community College instructor was given the opportunity to connect with other professionals in the international education field during a recent professional development experience abroad.

As part of Jackson State University’s (JSU’s) Executive Ph.D. Program (EPhD) in Urban Higher Education, CCC Computer Servicing Technology Instructor Melvin “Tony” Newson traveled to the University of Concordia in Montréal, Quebec, where he was presented the unique opportunity to observe the culture and politics of the university and its community.

As part of the program, Newsome compared and contrasted the university (which is not affiliated with Concordia University in the U.S.) as well as met with the executive team, faculty, and doctoral students to learn about their university and higher education system.

According to Newsome, with more than 45,000 students, Concordia University was full of exciting people.

“Unlike our K-12 school system, Montréal’s grade school stops at the 11th grade. Students will then go to CEGEP (originally a French acronym for Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel) sometimes known in English as a "General and Vocational College,” explained Newsome.

Newsome said CEGEP is the equivalent of the community college system in the USA as it similarly prepares students for a four-year college or university. 

“Here, students finish their 12th grade year and then complete either 1 or 2 years of college depending on their career aspirations.  CEGEPs are free with the exception of $200 for fees,” he said.

Newsome said he noted several differences between the American and Canadian higher education systems.

“Higher education in Montréal is heavily subsidized by the government,” he said. “Graduate students pay only about $2500 yearly for tuition, although sales tax rates are relatively high. Sales tax in Montréal is about 15%, roughly double what we pay in Mississippi.”

Newson, who joined CCC’s faculty in 2007, received a bachelor’s degree in Applied Physics from JSU and a master’s degree in Micro-electronics/Photonics from the University of Arkansas. He is currently pursuing a doctorate in Urban Higher Education from JSU.