Advisors in Training

Staff Members Learn Effective Student Advising

Southwest Tennessee Community College retention and student success executive director Jacqueline Taylor, Ed.D., recently conducted a one-day seminar in which she intervened in the aspect of student advising at Coahoma.

Staff Members Learn Effective Student Advising

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Thu Jul 18, 2019

Jacqueline Taylor

Southwest Tennessee Community College retention and student success executive director Jacqueline Taylor, Ed.D., recently conducted a one-day seminar in which she intervened in the aspect of student advising at Coahoma. 16 Coahoma Community College staff members, including Academic and Career-Tech counselors and department heads, took the MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) personality assessment, which demonstrated the need to accurately aid students that display contrasting traits. Based on their assessment results, participating personnel separated into two groups classified as ‘introvert’ and ‘extravert.’

Presented with scenarios and exercises revealing how they differ in perspective, staff members recognized the importance of figuring out adaptive strategies that will enable them to better serve Coahoma students. The employees divided into categories of sensor and intuitive people, judging and perceiving personalities, thinking and feeling personalities, as well as other classifications.

Advisors in TrainingWhile the staff members were separated as sensor and intuitive personalities, Taylor concluded that it is imperative that the intuitive personalities should set aside their tendency to see the big picture in situations and begin with manageable amounts of information when advising a student displaying the ‘here and now’ trait of sensor people.

Give to every student what they need to be successful; it requires communication, Taylor said.

Taylor emphasized the importance of impartiality when it comes to a diverse population composed of traditional and non-traditional students.

She told the staff, “It requires you to remove your bias…if you’re going to be holistic student developers.”