David Jones

Reaching the “Quest 100” Finish Line

English instructor David Jones ended 2018 and stepped into 2019 a champion. He excitedly completed what he termed “Quest 100,” which challenged him to run at least 100 miles in races last year.

Reaching the “Quest 100” Finish Line

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Tue May 28, 2019

David JonesEnglish instructor David Jones ended 2018 and stepped into 2019 a champion. He excitedly completed what he termed “Quest 100,” which challenged him to run at least 100 miles in races last year.

“I usually average five or six races per year. For some strange reason, I had the audacity to want to upgrade that to 10 races,” said Jones.

Jones also wanted his students to take part in the Quest 100 challenge, handing each of his students a sheet of paper at the start of the semester so they could jot down major goals for 2018. Some were family-related hopes while others wrote that they wanted to be on track to graduate from Coahoma Community College in May of 2019. Some even aimed to finish their classes with all A’s.

“I clocked in at 105 miles total, so I met my physical goal, but their goals could have dealt with family,” said Jones.

Jones landed first place in the category correspondent with his age range in the Port Gibson, Mississippi Dilla Dash road race within 29 minutes and 24 seconds.

Additionally, Jones trekked with spirited speed for various causes.  He ran in the Marks Mules and Blues 5K Run/Walk, in which he won third place; the Greenville Cotton Classic race; the Run for the Ribbons race in Jackson, Mississippi; the Clarksdale Juke Joint race; the Batesville Run for Paws race; the Gateway to the Delta race; the Atlanta Peachtree Road Race; the Greenwood 300 Oaks; the Oxford Great 38 and the Elvis 5k. He ran 3 to 6 miles in each road race and added to the list his grand achievements of running 26 miles in the St. Jude Marathon and the Jackson Blues Marathon.

The temperature during the races ranged from an unbearable 89 to a frigid 32 degrees, he said.

Jones said he simply cannot train for marathons. He, however, kept up a routine of running 6 to 7 miles, three days a week to prepare for them. The fitness-conscious racer worked out regularly at Snap Fitness and made energetic laps on Coahoma’s Fit for Life Walking Trail.

“I’m drawn to competition,” Jones said. “I actually have earned quite a few medals in these races for my age group and I finished with third place in the Marks, Mississippi Mules & Blues race.”

Jones, who says he’s been an avid runner all of his life, was a member of his high school track team in Decatur, Georgia. He has an affinity for the sport and thoughts of how blessed he is to put one foot in front of the other crowd his mind while running the races.

He remembers being able to maintain his drive to complete his Quest 100 challenge after hearing his church pastor Dan Sandalin tell a story while preaching his Sunday sermon. The story was about an African American man who made it to the Olympics but was derailed by a cramp in his leg during a race.

“His father came down from the stands to help him cross over the line,” said Jones, who believes that had to have been one of the most riveting scenes in an Olympics game. “I’ve actually used that as a metaphor for my races, to continue the run by all means.”

Jones sends special thanks to his supporters, longtime friend Denise Hampton, his beloved disabled brother Jonathan Jones; CCC personnel including Dr. Towner, Dr. Rolanda Brown, Helen Young, John Mayo, Vera Griffin and many others.