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CCC Cosmetology program hosts safety course for area professionals
CLARKSDALE – Strawberry syrup oozed down the gloves of local barbers and stylists as they put their skills to the test by removing their gloves without contacting the syrup.

 

CCC Cosmetology program hosts safety course for area professionals

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4061 - Brittany Davis-Green - bdavis@coahomacc.edu

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Wed Jun 22, 2016

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CLARKSDALE – Strawberry syrup oozed down the gloves of local barbers and stylists as they put their skills to the test by removing their gloves without contacting the syrup.

While it seemed like simply a fun exercise, Coahoma Community College Cosmetology Instructor Shirley Ferguson-Hicks said the skill could literally help save their lives.  

“Many times as professional stylists we get so familiar with our clients that we don’t realize the risks we’re exposing ourselves to when we come in contact with blood, rashes and other skins conditions,” said Ferguson-Hicks to the group during a professional development course Monday.

Professional stylist, barbers and instructors from CCC's five-county district attended the course entitled, "The Million Dollar Tip—Safety Before Beauty".

Hosted by the Division of Career and Technical Education and organized by Ferguson-Hicks, the course schooled attendees on the alarming number of health risks they face daily in the work place, and what he or she can do to help minimize the risk.

Hicks, who has served as an instructor at CCC for 24-years, said she designed the course as a refresher for professionals currently in the beauty industry.

“I’m an avid reader and I’ve read several articles and the number of health and safety concerns in this industry is alarming,” she told the class.

“It took a while for this field to get the recognition it deserves, so the purpose of the this course is to show people, who don’t view beauticians and barbers as having dangerous jobs, that we do face numerous risks on a daily basis.”

Hicks said the course was also designed to keep salon professional abreast on actions that can be taken to minimize health and safety risks.

“Because of the alarming number of accidents, lawsuits, and the increase in health risks in the salon, it is important that the professional be informed and always aware of what’s going on in the workplace regarding potential health risks,” she said.

In addition to learning about health risks taken in the workplace and how they can be minimized, attendees also discussed current trends in health related lawsuits as well as developing and implementing a business safety plan.

Ferguson-Hicks said she plans to host a follow-up course in the near future.