Our House

Student Conduct Board Focuses on Inclusivity in Training

The Dating and Domestic Violence Prevention Program’s Student Conduct Board honed in on making the institution’s student conduct policy more inclusive.

Student Conduct Board Focuses on Inclusivity in Training

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

-

Fri May 8, 2020

Our House

The Dating and Domestic Violence Prevention Program’s Student Conduct Board honed in on making the institution’s student conduct policy more inclusive. In an online interactive training conducted by Dr. Patricia Davenport, executive director and co-founder of the Greenville-based intervention resource, Our House, Incorporated, members of the board were lectured on providing a student-friendly policy.

Davenport recommended incorporating a visible and streamlined process for domestic violence victims to follow when they seek to file a report. She mentioned the assignment of an advocate as well as an ‘outside counselor.’

“Sometimes, a victim may feel better with a stranger than with someone who knows their history,” said Davenport.

Domestic Violence Online ConferenceAfter commending the student conduct policy’s discouragement of cyberbullying, she pointed out that the offender is not the only person that pressures the victim into not filing a report. The pressure could also come from the campus community.

Seeking to underscore the inclusivity of students associated with the LGBTQ community, Davenport asked the board members to listen to the testimony of Vinceysha Bunton-Mackin, an employee of Our House, who experienced sexual assault as a child.

“I am a survivor of rape and a secondary survivor of domestic violence,” said Mackin. “For years, I blamed myself, and I refused to open up about it. I just totally changed as a person.” She eventually regained her confidence.

“I consider myself a pansexual, meaning that I don’t fall in love with a gender; I fall in love with a person regardless of their gender,” she added.

Mackin emphasized that it is more helpful to show concern instead of curiosity. She encouraged responding with, ‘I’m sorry this happened to you.’ The 21-year-old believes that teaching young men that no means no rather than educating young women on what not to wear can help put an end to sexual assault and domestic violence.

Davenport offered the idea of forming a support group for LGBTQ students at Coahoma Community College and suggested that the student conduct board become familiar with the common language used within the LGBTQ community.

For more information, contact program coordinator Kenneth Gooden at (662)645-1907 or kgooden@coahomacc.edu. Contact prevention liaison and coordinator of counseling services Dr. Renee Hall at (662)457-6635 or rsanford@coahomacc.edu.