Program Director Promotes Respiratory Care Major in Response to Shortage

Donald Savery

Program Director Promotes Respiratory Care Major in Response to Shortage

Respiratory Care program director Dr. Willie Lockett is paying particular attention to a specific discovery. The coronavirus crisis has revealed a nationwide shortage of respiratory therapists.

Program Director Promotes Respiratory Care Major in Response to Shortage

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Fri May 1, 2020

Donald SaveryDonald Savery, a 2010 graduate of the Respiratory Care program, believes optimism is the key to conquering the global spread of the coronavirus.

He is using the techniques he learned as a Health Science student to properly handle the effects of the coronavirus outbreak as a respiratory therapist at a hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he resides.

“I’m keeping the patient’s health a priority and staying focused,” said Savery. “I’m staying safe by wearing the PPE and washing my hands after every task.”

He aims to create a safe space for himself, patients, and colleagues.

With Louisiana having experienced a surge in coronavirus infections, Savery, 29, is in a work environment that has taken the necessary precautionary measures.

Along with other health care workers, his temperature is taken, and he is asked a series of questions before every shift at the Ochsner Center for Primary Care and Wellness.

“Upon clocking in, a supervisor passes out N-95 masks,” says Savery. “There are also tables throughout each floor with disinfectant spray/wipes, additional gowns, and gloves.”

As other states, specifically New York, Michigan, Florida, and Illinois, have experienced a rise in cases and deaths, Respiratory Care program director Dr. Willie Lockett is paying particular attention to a specific discovery. The coronavirus crisis has revealed a nationwide shortage of respiratory therapists. According to one of the latest Associated Press articles, some hotels and motels in the U.S. are offering free rooms to emergency and health care workers serving in hotspot areas.

Dr. Willie Lockett and CCC StudentsLockett seeks to help grow the industry by urging qualified individuals interested in the health care field to consider applying to the College’s Respiratory Care program. The program takes four academic semesters and two summer sessions to complete. Students are trained in both the technical and clinical elements of respiratory care.

The following coronavirus-related findings are from various news sites, including New York news outlet The City. Here are some facts that give you a reason to make Respiratory Care your chosen field of study.

  • While the coronavirus is a respiratory illness that attacks the lungs and respiratory system, a percentage of patients may need to be intubated, which means having a breathing tube inserted. It is required for the assistance of a ventilator. This is where the respiratory therapist comes in, using his or her expertise in operating the life support machine for patients.
  • Respiratory therapists are the only ones in the health care industry trained to operate the ventilator. This breathing machine comes to the aid of COVID-19 patients who end up having difficulty breathing on their own.
  • CCC Respiratory CareRespiratory therapists are given the task of tailoring the ventilator settings to the patient’s need. Learning proper usage takes extensive training. Nurses can be taught how to set up the machine and read levels, but a licensed respiratory therapist is needed for all other evaluations and functions involved.
  • Retired respiratory therapists have given up relaxation to serve on the front lines of the health crisis.
  • The median salary for the respiratory care profession was $61,330 in 2019, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The original deadline to apply for the Respiratory Care program was May 15, 2020; however, the application deadline has been extended due to the coronavirus. To learn about admission requirements or access the application, go to http://www.coahomacc.edu/programs-of-study/health-sciences/respiratory-care/admission-guidelines/index.

For more information, contact the Respiratory Care department at 621-4687. Contact program director Dr. Willie Lockett at 621-4221 / wlockett@coahomacc.edu.