Kierre Rimmer Encourages Students to End the Struggle, Persist

Kierre Rimmer

Kierre Rimmer Encourages Students to End the Struggle, Persist

The struggle is real—Guest speaker Kierre Rimmer flipped the widely used saying to “The struggler is real,” incorporating in his talk the actual struggle of black historians who fought for African American rights.

Kierre Rimmer Encourages Students to End the Struggle, Persist

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Wed Feb 19, 2020

Kierre Rimmer and CCC Students

The struggle is real—Guest speaker Kierre Rimmer flipped the widely used saying to “The struggler is real,” incorporating into his talk the actual struggle of black historians who fought for African American rights.

Business and CIS Instructor Jeremy Pittman began the first of more events scheduled for the month of February in observance of Black History Month with a piece of advice. He serves as chair of the Black History Month committee.

Jeremy Pittman“As long as you are breathing air in this world, things will never go the way that you always want them to,” he said. “However, with faith, with perseverance, you can achieve anything that you want to achieve.”

Pittman then introduced the featured motivational speaker of the program, Kierre Rimmer, the founder of FLY Zone (Forever Lifting Youth), an initiative based in Bolivar County that equips the youth and encourages their holistic growth. It was founded in July of 2013.

Rimmer brought up the minor present-day issues we depict as “the struggle” to make the point that black historians were the real ‘strugglers.’

Kierre Rimmer“If Dr. King was here, if Rosa Parks was here, or Marcus Garvey, they wouldn’t say the struggle is real because you couldn’t get your hair done,” Rimmer said. “They wouldn’t say the struggle is real because you didn’t make a good grade in class, and you know you didn’t study.”

Rimmer changed the saying to ‘The struggler is real,’ pushing the audience to persist despite the everyday challenges that may arise.

“It means they moved, and they were persistent regardless of what was going on around them,” he added.

“Things keep moving. Even in death, life still goes on. It’s more than a t-shirt; it’s more than a hashtag. It’s time for you to be black presence… If you really love Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Oprah Winfrey, or whomever it may be; if you really love them, you would make them love you,” he shared.

Rimmer told the students to find a reason from within to overcome their obstacles.

“The struggler is real—It doesn’t mean ‘I can’t do it. It doesn’t mean it doesn’t get tight.’ It means, ‘I keep moving even though it gets tight,’” Rimmer said.

Rimmer’s FLY Zone initiative is set to offer its third summer camp to teach on STEM fields as well as recreational activities. During the Q-and-A at the close of the event, Rimmer said the FLY Zone organization started out carrying a negative connotation. It once stood for things such as smoking weed but has evolved into an organization that comes to the aid of his community.

Pittman added comments about the purpose of the event on behalf of the Black History Month committee.

“The Black History Committee felt like this program today would be very good because our students have so many struggles that hinder them from being able to finish their education. Sometimes hearing reaffirmations and hearing advice on how to stay in school, how to weed through all of the noise is helpful,” he said.

“We thank Mr. Kierre Rimmer for taking time out of his schedule to come and work with our students,” he stated.

“I think our students have been moved. I think they have been motivated, and I think that with Mr. Rimmer as well as the resources here at Coahoma Community College, we can ensure that our students are on a mission to achieve success.”