SAAM
Domestic Violence Prevention Program Promotes Consent for SAAM

With April serving as Sexual Assault Awareness Month, the Dating and Domestic Violence Prevention Program is thoroughly defining consent. The purpose of highlighting this skill is to alleviate the possibility of sexual assault cases.

Domestic Violence Prevention Program Promotes Consent for SAAM

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Fri Apr 17, 2020

Consent

With April serving as Sexual Assault Awareness Month, the Dating and Domestic Violence Prevention Program is thoroughly defining consent. The purpose of highlighting this skill is to alleviate the possibility of sexual assault cases. Consent is participants agreeing to engage in sexual activity. Here are some bites of information to keep in mind when becoming intimate with a partner:

  • Consent is not confined to verbal means of communication. However, verbal agreement to various sexual activities is an effective method ensuring that both partners’ boundaries are respected. Physical cues, on the other hand, can let a partner know you’re comfortable taking things to the next level.
  • Consent is achieved through communication, and it should happen every time. Consenting to a sexual act is not an agreement to increased activity or subsequent instances of sexual contact. Agreeing to kiss someone does not give that person permission to remove your clothes. Having sex with someone on a past occasion does not permit sex with them in the future.

  • Understand that you may withdraw consent at any point during sexual activity. Communicate to your partner that you are no longer comfortable with the activity and that you wish to stop. The best way for both parties to ensure they are comfortable with activity is to talk.
  • Positive Consent The Dating and Domestic Violence Prevention Program encourages initiating verbal communication when you desire to change the type or degree of sexual activity. Ask things like, ‘Is this okay?’  Explicitly agreeing to activities with “yes” or another affirmative statement such as “I’m open to trying it,” will alleviate the possibility of ambiguous communication.

Unacceptable Ideas of Consent

  • Refusing to acknowledge a “no” from the other party is not acceptable.
  • The kind of clothing one is wearing, flirting, and kissing does not signal approval of certain activities.
  • A person incapacitated from drugs or alcohol is unable to make sound decisions.
  • The prevention program frowns upon the use of fear or intimidation to pressure someone into participating in intimate activities.
  • Do not assume you have one’s permission to engage in a sexual act just because you have previously done the activity.

Contact program coordinator Kenneth Gooden at (662)645-1907, email: kgooden@coahomacc.edu, or contact prevention liaison Renee Hall at (662)457-6635, email: rsanford@coahomacc.edu for more information on sexual assault and the Dating and Domestic Violence Prevention Program.