Mr. & Miss CCC 2020

Brown and Rodges Announced Mr. and Miss Coahoma Community College 2020-21

Jeremy Brown, of Memphis, Tennessee, and Kaylin Rodges, of Shaw, Mississippi, were crowned in front of family, friends, and members of the campus community.

Brown and Rodges Announced Mr. and Miss Coahoma Community College 2020-21

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

-

Tue Mar 10, 2020

CCC Pageant 2020 Contestants

The audience kept their eyes peeled while waiting to see which of the three ladies would end the competition with flooding tear ducts of joy in its purest form. Camera phones floated as the gentleman who best charmed the judges was announced.

At last night’s Mr. and Miss CCC competition, Jeremy Brown, of Memphis, Tennessee, and Kaylin Rodges, of Shaw, Mississippi, were crowned in front of family, friends, and members of the campus community.

Lambert, Mississippi, native Tariah Williams, and Clarksdale, Mississippi, native Demetric Strong Jr. were named second alternates. Khalela Dennis, of Memphis, Tennessee, and Corterrius Allen, of Shelby, Mississippi, placed as runners-up.

For Rodges, a general education major, the desire to improve the institution, serve as the face of the school, and represent it well motivated her decision to enter the competition.

“When I found out it was judges, I was like, ‘This should be fun,’” said Rodges.

Though she partly had doubts about winning, she stated that the astounding victory was indeed a moment to remember.

Mr. & Miss CCC 2020During her one-question onstage interview with Student Engagement director Karen Done, she spoke on her stance regarding the recently revealed issue Parchman’s Mississippi State Penitentiary inmates have been facing.

“My heart goes out to every victim and their family,” Rodges said.

“Not all of the people there belong there, and even the ones that do should not be treated like animals. It is overpopulated and there needs to be a change.”

Rodges serenaded the audience with a song about love for the talent segment. She is torn between studying to become a chiropractor and a custody attorney. The Honors College student is looking to further her education at an out-of-state four-year college that offers a diverse campus.

Ikia Crisler, a student of the College and a close family member of Rodges spoke on her cousin’s win, saying, “I’m just proud of her accomplishments and how hard she works. When you’ve been knocked down several times, and you finally get a win, it’s everybody’s win. So, it’s my win, too.”

The day before the competition, contestants competed in an oratorical component where they talked on the kinds of issues they would combat as superheroes. The competitors also participated in a private interview making up 15 percent of their final scores, an evening wear, lifestyle-fitness wear, and an onstage interview portion.

Brown, the newly crowned Mr. Coahoma Community College and music education major, was urged by his peers to compete for the title.

“I was like, ‘Sure, I’ll do it,’ and I did it,” said Brown.

Throughout the event, he focused on staying prayed up and maintained confidence in his abilities while also making the competition an enjoyment.

“When they were cheering for me, I was going even more out of my comfort zone, doing stuff I don’t usually do,” he recounted. “So when they got hype, I got hype.”

The Tiger Marching Band member colored the talent segment with a whimsical selection on lead trombone while accompanied by a trombone ensemble. His platform will bring the idea of spicing up campus life to the forefront.

Brown hopes to complete his undergraduate study at either Jackson State University or Tennessee State University. He plans on receiving his master’s in music education and sees himself becoming a band director.

“It was a nail-biter because they all brought something different this time,” said Ira Nealy, a Helena-West Helena, Arkansas, native who attended the event and teaches at a local elementary school.

Coahoma Community College president Dr. Valmadge T. Towner concluded the event with the exciting news that each contestant had earned scholarships just for their participation. He pointed out that the competition broke the tradition of being based on votes about five years ago.

“If I were a student today, I would not have the courage, fortitude, or talent to do what they’re doing,” said Towner. “Each of the participants tonight are truly, truly superstars, and survivors.”