Pam Chatman

Misconduct Training Held for Prevention Program Personnel, Guest Speaker Gets Candid in Relationship Summit

Conducting a training session focused on ways to improve handling situations of stalking, sexual abuse and domestic abuse, the campus victim service coordinator for the Mississippi Coalition Against Sexual Assault (MSCASA) Frances White, Ph.D., enlightened staff members on properly dealing with incidents of domestic violence recently.

Misconduct Training Held for Prevention Program Personnel, Guest Speaker Gets Candid in Relationship Summit

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Tue Feb 5, 2019

Training Personnel

Conducting a training session focused on ways to improve handling situations of stalking, sexual abuse and domestic abuse, the campus victim service coordinator for the Mississippi Coalition Against Sexual Assault (MSCASA) Frances White, Ph.D., enlightened staff members on properly dealing with incidents of domestic violence recently.

Coahoma’s on-campus Dating and Domestic Violence Prevention program gained insight on the importance of confidentiality.

If the students don’t feel like they can vent and disclose in confidence, then they’re not coming, White said.

Having worked as a licensed therapist at Jackson State University’s counseling center, White helped CCC employees brainstorm strategies for dealing with situations of domestic violence professionally and ethically.

“Many of our victims do not report for the mere fact that they are afraid to be blamed for what may have happened,” White said.

Student Engagement staff members tuned in to White’s presentation as she shared alarming statistics. One of which is that the victim knows their attacker in 90 percent of sexual assault cases at HBCUs.

White urges victim services on college campuses to set up a 24-hour hotline for domestic violence reporting.

Victim advocates from the Mississippi Office of the Attorney General Mya Edwards and Amanda Jasper also presented information, explaining that victims have the right to be heard and informed throughout the process of their case.

Edwards, who has worked with victims of child abuse and sexual assault in the Lauderdale County area for 12 years, spoke on the Victim Compensation program which is available in all 50 states in the United States. She emphasized that there’s no law to keep victims from remaining informed of the status of their case.

Pam Chatman at CCC

On the other end of the spectrum is knowing when you are a victim of stalking, sexual abuse and domestic abuse. Regarded as a National Stalking Awareness Month event, Bolivar County native Pam Chatman detailed her first-hand experience with domestic abuse in her relationship of 17 years. The Whiteside Hall lecture room filled up with students lined along the walls to hear the entrepreneur’s story, which resulted in her ending the relationship. All ears leaned in and every eye followed Chatman who paced back and forth across the floor during an intriguing and engaging talk. She recounted heartbreaking occurrences during her abusive relationship.

“I was 17 when I started dating this guy and we dated until I was 34 years old,” she said.

“In the back of my mind, I knew I was somebody special. But I was afraid.”

Her partner, whom she described as muscular, abused her verbally as well as physically.

Chatman said that it took long for her to realize her worth and leave the relationship because she was told as a young girl she would never amount to anything in life.

Reflecting on the time her partner began stalking her when she tried to end their relationship, she told the students signs of stalking.

“It’s important to tell you that I survived,” she continued, advising the students to get out of abusive relationships. 

Chatman specifically encouraged the women to become self-sufficient and work on accomplishing their career goals rather than depending on their future mate for provision or a lavish lifestyle.

A highway leading to Greenville, Mississippi has been named in her honor. She has launched her own national television network and cosmetic line. Although television opportunities have led her to Hollywood and to guest hosting the popular daytime show ‘The Talk’ on CBS, she chooses to remain in Mississippi because “there are some good things that come out of the Mississippi Delta.”

Tasha Tucker, the domestic violence coordinator for the Coahoma County Sheriff Department, concluded the summit with a moving talk on the troubling outcomes that result from domestic violence. She concluded the event with a question and answer session with students.

It takes a victim, on average, eight times to leave their aggressor, Tucker said.

“Domestic violence or dating violence knows no gender, no race, no religion, no socioeconomic status,” she added.

Kenneth Gooden, the program coordinator for the Dating and Domestic Violence Prevention program, says the feedback from Chatman’s presentation has been phenomenal.

“Ms. Pam Chatman was able to connect with them by sharing her own personal story and being an example of perseverance,” Gooden said.

“We were not looking to present another event that basically just shares statistics and information. We were looking to create an atmosphere that offered the audience a chance to be real about their present condition and see for themselves that they can still overcome obstacles that stand in their way.”