Kishki Hall, Ph.D., Named 2019 Humanities Teacher of the Year

Hall has recently been chosen the Humanities Teacher of the Year, an honor of prestige awarded each year to a faculty member who teaches within the realm of the humanities subject area and has been deemed a remarkable instructor by President Towner and Academic Affairs Dean Rolanda Brown.

Kishki Hall, Ph.D., Named 2018 Humanities Teacher of the Year

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Thu Jan 24, 2019

Kishki Hall’s dream job consisted of cue cards and video cameras, but her schooling led her down another long-admired path. With motivational speaking as a fulfilling enjoyment, Hall seeks to positively influence the minds of today’s youth. She hopes to spark the mind that will change the world.

“I went to school to be a talk show host. I really didn’t go to be a teacher,” said Hall. “Being around great teachers made me want to be a teacher because I looked at what they did for me and how they changed my life.”

Hall has recently been chosen the Humanities Teacher of the Year, an honor of prestige awarded each year to a faculty member who teaches within the realm of the humanities subject area and has been deemed a remarkable instructor by President Towner and Academic Affairs Dean Rolanda Brown.

Hall is very honored to have been selected the recipient of the award.

“I feel that I deserve it because I do take my job seriously,” she said. “I love what I do and I’m passionate about it. I’m just grateful to be chosen.”

Fully immersing herself into her studies, the Cleveland, Mississippi native received her Bachelor of Arts degree in mass communication from Mississippi Valley State University, emphasizing in radio and television broadcast and a Master of Science degree in mass communication from Arkansas State University. She completed her doctoral education in community college leadership at Mississippi State University with a 4.0 GPA and received a post-doctoral master’s degree in communication studies in 2015. 

Her alma mater, Eastside High School, located in Cleveland, is where she first began teaching. In 2004, Hall became an oral communication class adjunct instructor at Coahoma Community College and came on board fulltime in 2010 teaching public speaking. 

Hall takes pride in practicing a teaching method rooted and grounded in setting high standards for students.

“I believe we have to train our students to live in excellence and not in mediocrity,” she explained. “People oftentimes want to say I’m hard, but it’s not about being hard or rigorous; it’s about excellence.”

Day by day, she works toward her personal mission of preparing students to be productive citizens when they leave Coahoma.

In order to achieve this goal, she believes she and fellow colleagues must raise their standards for students.

A student will only go as far as you expect them to, she says.

“Students will meet you wherever you put the bar or at least, they attempt to,” Hall pointed out. “So, you have to raise the expectations of our young people.”

She counts it a blessing to have a mother whom she can pray with regularly. Her siblings are also included in her support system. She depends on them to keep her encouraged.

Hall introduces her favorite poem written by Marianne Williamson, “My Deepest Fear,” to students taking her class and uses it as a source of inspiration for her own life.

It excites her to watch students begin her class “shy and not-so-eager” to speak in front of the class and gradually evolve.

“By the last speech, I see where they have totally changed and they have that confidence,” she said.

Hall strives to motivate young people to not only dream, but to also “work their dream.” Otherwise, they’re life goals are just mere ambitions.

Having the God-given opportunity to inspire someone to be greater drives her to continue impacting lives.

“Being able to give back to this community means a lot to me because I’m from a community like Clarksdale,” she said.

“It hasn’t been easy but as I look back, it was all worth it…Knowing that I can come back and inspire other young people to go on and get their education, to go on and find a great job or a good career or a great career—That motivates me.”