Zephaniah Stokes

Coahoma Closes Out Black History Month with Markings of Cultural Migration from 1619 to 2019

On-lookers of the campus community watched black history migrate from the early days of slavery to the present-day African-American culture through musical selections and poems at a recent black history program.

Coahoma Closes Out Black History Month with Markings of Cultural Migration from 1619 to 2019

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Mon Mar 4, 2019

Rosalind Wilcox

On-lookers of the campus community watched black history migrate from the early days of slavery to the present-day African-American culture through musical selections and poems at a recent black history program.

Sharing the ASALH (Association for the Study of African American Life and History) 2019 theme, ‘Black Migrations,’ Coahoma’s Division of Academic Affairs organized an occasion for members of the campus to listen to readings, musical selections and poems centered on the fight for freedom among those of African descent and the cultural practices that marked those times.

Venesia Brown, a close friend of the campus community who has served as an adjunct instructor narrated the program, introducing song selections with readings, while retired English instructor Wanda Reed read poems to the audience; two in particular were “Mid Way” by Naomi Long Madgett and “If We Must Die” by Claude McKay.

“400 years of strong men and strong women—the plight of the African American is one of many migrations,” Brown said.

Zipporah WardClarksdale native Darnell Turner used the digital piano to play a snippet of ragtime, a musical style that birthed out of the Harlem Renaissance. CCC choir members Zipporah Ward and Zephaniah Stokes and two other performers vocally demonstrated the timeline of different stylings originating from the black race that were sang throughout history.

Brown concluded with an excerpt from the poem entitled “For My People,” written by Margaret Walker.

“Let a second generation full of courage issue forth,” she said reciting the poem. “Let a people loving freedom come to growth. Let a beauty full of healing and strength, a final clenching be the pulsing in our spirits and our blood.”

Wilcox Art ClassworkWith an art exhibition of paintings and artifacts students created in art classes lining the back of The Pinnacle, Art department chair Rosalind Wilcox announced the winners of the art contest featuring black historians and African-inspired designs.

Keisha Calhoun, a sophomore art major won first place and a prize of $400 for her painting of celebrity Whoopi Goldberg, two patterned pillows and a bottle she designed. CCC freshman Kyler Conley came in second place. Sophomore art major Masiqua Ford won third place with a painting of Barack Obama and sophomore Shakenya Stateum placed fourth.