CCC Fall Harvest Festival concludes with “Letter From Louie”
CLARKSDALE – Whether you prefer to call him Louis, Louie, Satchmo, Pops or Ambassador of Love— George W. Stewart’s “Letter From Louie” play is as close to real thing as you can get to meeting the legendary jazz musician Louis Armstrong.

CCC Fall Harvest Festival concludes with “Letter From Louie”

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4061 - Brittany Davis-Green - bdavis@coahomacc.edu

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Fri Nov 21, 2014

CLARKSDALE – Whether you prefer to call him Louis, Louie, Satchmo, Pops or Ambassador of Love— George W. Stewart’s “Letter From Louie” play is as close to real thing as you can get to meeting the legendary jazz musician Louis Armstrong.

Students, faculty, staff and community members were treated Wednesday night as Coahoma Community College concluded its 2014 Fall Harvest Festival celebration on a high note with a special theatrical performance of the play.

The free event, sponsored by CCC’s Lyceum Committee, kicked off with some soulful, acoustic selections by Hishonda Wilson. Anthony Williams of Last Psalm Ministries then took the stage, playing the part of the iconic jazz singer Louis Armstrong.

Williams played several live gospel, jazz-inspired musical selections on his trumpet and even replicated Armstrong’s signature raspy voice. Set in one scene at Armstrong’s home, the play chronicled Armstrong’s conversations with God, whom he affectionately called the “Big Man”, as he prepared to perform one the greatest, most sacred gospel concerts of his life.

It’s Stewart’s fourth year bringing his work to CCC and he said he’s looking forward to continuing the relationship.

“We truly thank Coahoma Community College—this is my second home,” said Williams during his remarks.

Armstrong said he was inspired to write to play to inform the younger generation of Armstrong’s great impact on the music scene.

“All of the things that we shared were factual regarding one of the greatest entertainers of all times and the inventor of the jazz genre—Louis Armstrong,” said Stewart. “We don’t know much about him and that’s one of the reasons why we wanted to present this play. …It’s good to know the history of our music.”

Although the play was entertaining, it also brought with it a larger message as well.

“Our desire is that every person in attendance will leave challenged to do something beyond their comfort zone and will walk away from this play inspired to do it just like Louis Armstrong pushed past his comfort zone to answer the call,” Stewart said.

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