Tiger Pride Wk

‘Tiger Pride Week’ Activities Redeem Welcome Week Cancellation

Students escaped isolation during Tiger Pride Week, a series of student activities hosted by the Student Government Association. A drive-in screening and "Open Mic Nite" took their minds off deadlines. Rolonda Willis, a freshman from Pine Bluff, Arkansas, says, "The changes are very hard to cope with, but college isn't so bad during this pandemic. I believe it could be worse."

‘Tiger Pride Week’ Activities Redeem Welcome Week Cancellation

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

-

Fri Oct 2, 2020

Meet Greet

Students got to explore a few of the facets that make those who have walked the halls of Coahoma Community College proud to be Tiger alums.

What currently fosters Tiger pride is a spirit of unity that binds students into a family in the middle of a coronavirus pandemic. Though daily temperature checks are mandated, and masks, a requirement, the rare campus culture of the College shines through.

Movie Night

Students escaped isolation during Tiger Pride Week, a series of student activities hosted by the Student Government Association. A drive-in screening of a thriller near the Fit for Life Walking Trail sent students into relaxation mode and took their minds off deadlines. A mixed batch of talents showcased the following evening at "Open Mic Nite" offered up awe-inspiring moments.

The SGA closed out with an outdoor Meet and Greet. Spontaneous dance sessions continued from the night before as members of the Student Government Association invited peers to their personalized welcome tables.

While mandatory COVID-19 testing preceded the activities, Tiger Nation was able to fellowship safely.

Ro Willis

Frederick Walker, a freshman who serves as the Student Outreach Liaison in the Student Government Association, believes that embarking on his college education during the COVID-19 pandemic will only condition him for more significant undertakings.

"I don't think the pandemic is a good enough reason to stop the college experience because as a collective and as of one mind, we have to show that we can persevere through anything that comes our way," said Walker.

He plans to study athletic training and kinesiology as a double major at a four-year college after graduating from Coahoma.

Rolonda Willis, a freshman from Pine Bluff, Arkansas, says, "The changes are very hard to cope with, but college isn't so bad during this pandemic. I believe it could be worse." Willis has a high interest in fashion design.

Open Mic