Breast Cancer Walk

Campus Community Celebrates Breast Cancer Survivors at “Paws for a Cause” Walk

In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, students and supporters of breast cancer awareness crowded around the front entrance of the Zee A. Barron Student Union to hear inspiring stories from two survivors of the terminal illness during homecoming week.

Campus Community Celebrates Breast Cancer Survivors at “Paws for a Cause” Walk

Press Release from Coahoma Community College Public Relations; (662) 621-4057 - Melody Dixon

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Mon Oct 8, 2018

Breast Cancer Walk

In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, students and supporters of breast cancer awareness crowded around the front entrance of the Zee A. Barron Student Union to hear inspiring stories from two survivors of the terminal illness during homecoming week.

The group walked a lap around the block of the Student Union and ended with a balloon release in the parking lot behind the Pinnacle.

Bobbie Griffin, the mother of Student Engagement assistant director LaShasa Griffin, shared that she didn’t get a proper diagnosis of breast cancer until a year after she discovered a knot. Because she was in search of a doctor right after the Easter holiday in April of 2008, it was hard for her to find a doctor. After being told the news she was sent to a specialist.

“I went to the Breast Clinic in Memphis, and I was at stage three,” Griffin said.

Since the cancer had progressed, she believed that it was the end, and she was under the impression that she would not have the same mobility and body strength. She received radiation and chemotherapy for treatment. Now a retired teacher, she continued going to work daily and received chemotherapy when the work day was over.

“…But through prayer, God has sustained me here, right now. And I am standing breast cancer-free,” said Griffin.

“My youngest brother, he was the one who helped me realize that if you’re going to win a battle, you have to go into it like you know who God is.”

Campus nurse Undra Haggan gave tips on early detection. She urged students to do self-checks regularly.

“The quicker you catch breast cancer or any type of cancer, the better the outcome,” said Haggan.

Breast Cancer WalkLongtime CCC librarian Mary Caradine also talked about her experience with the disease. Doctors discovered that she was carrying cancerous tissue in 2011.

“When I was diagnosed, I just went for a regular mammogram,” Caradine said.

“…The most important thing is to think positively.”

Her doctor advised her to refrain from informing others about her news, so that she would remain hopeful.

“A lot of people on this campus did not know because I was not sick. I only had to take radiation, no chemo,” she said.

It only took two surgeries to take out all of the harmful tissue. As a result, Caradine became breast cancer-free.

The participants had a moment of silence to remember those who lost their fight against breast cancer before letting go of the pink balloons.